Dyscalculia: Real, imaginary, or a more complex problem?

Dyscalculia: Real, imaginary, or a more complex problem?

Graham came to the MLC claiming he had been assessed for dyslexia and been diagnosed as moderately dyslexic but with serious problems in maths; it had been suggested he could be dyscalculic.

Looking at his assessment, he had problems processing and memorising auditory and visual information and processing information at speed. His scores in reading, writing and spelling were below average despite high intellectual ability. Verbal reasoning was superior and non-verbal reasoning average. The conclusion was that his achievements in English were not in line with his general ability, hence the diagnosis of moderate dyslexia. Maths, in particular, had a below average score, thus suggesting that there was a specific difficulty here. Reading and spelling were on the 47th and 53rd percentiles, respectively, but maths was actually on the 9th percentile.